Idaho 5th Grade Direct Writing Assessment Scoring Standard For Narrative Writing          January 2006

 

General Descriptions of Levels of Proficiency

 

“4”

Advanced (Clear)

 

“3”

Proficient (Clear)

Narrative writing tells about sequences of events, usually with the structure of a fiction or nonfiction story.

 

Although not flawless in relation to all three areas of focus, a “4” paper is an engaging piece of narrative writing.  Demonstrating a clearly defined understanding of narrative writing, the writer uses language that is above grade level to uniquely develop a clear and concise paper.  A score of "4" indicates the student's writing for that day and prompt demonstrates advanced proficiency for grade level.

 

A “3” paper demonstrates that the writer has an understanding of basic narrative writing.  The paper is clear, concise and easy to understand.  The writer uses age-appropriate language and attempts to “show” rather than “tell” but may not succeed throughout essay.  A score of "3" indicates that the student's writing for that day and prompt demonstrates proficiency at grade level.

 

Focusing on Six Traits

 

“4” Papers Exhibit MOST of the Characteristics Listed Below

 

“3” Papers Exhibit MOST of the Characteristics Listed Below

Ideas/Organization

Ideas

Ideas are the story line of the essay that, together with elaboration, anecdotes, or selected details, build reader’s understanding.

Organization

Organization, the internal structure of an essay, includes the lead, close and linking details.  Together, they create a picture that builds to a turning point in the story.  Transitions within the story assist the reader to avoid getting lost.

*   Developed and elaborated narrative

*    Effective introduction/satisfying conclusion

*    Organization is concise

*   Focused topic

*    Knowledge and/or experience of topic

*    Strong sense of direction within story

*    Ideas clearly express chronological sequencing

*    Details relate to time, place, character, plot and conclusion

*    Fresh approach and/or original ideas capture the reader’s interest

*    A developed narrative

*    Effective introduction/ordinary conclusion

*    Easily followed organization incorporates beginning, middle and end

*    Evident topic

*     Writing based on experience and/or knowledge of topic

*    Accounting of events that support narrative: time, place, character, plot and conclusion

*    Ideas express chronological sequencing

*    Transitions connect ideas

Voice/Word Choices

Voice

Voice involves effective writing that holds the reader's attention through the use of appropriate vocabulary.  Descriptive and figurative language makes writing unique by creating mood and feeling for the reader.

Word Choices

Word Choice involves the selecting words to create the mood, impression or word picture a writer desires to instill within the reader.

 

*    Figurative language: similes, metaphors and/or personification

*    Consistent voice throughout essay

*    Word choices may surprise, amuse or move reader and paint a picture in his/her mind

*    Unique, interesting and above-grade-level vocabulary demands reader’s attention

*    Effective descriptive language: adjectives, adverbs and powerful verbs

*    Effective use of ordinary words

*    Occasional use of effective, engaging slang or vernacular

*    Reflection of writer’s own experiences throughout essay

*   Predominantly active rather than passive voice

*    Figurative language attempted

*    Some voice in essay

*    Word choices may surprise, amuse, or move reader

*    Writing reflects interests and vocabulary spoken by fifth graders

*    Some descriptive language: adjectives, adverbs, verbs

*    Natural-sounding language – not overdone

*    Occasional use of appropriate slang

*    Glimpses of personal insights and feeling

*                              Vocabulary reflects writer’s personality

Fluency/Conventions

Sentence Fluency

Effective construction of a sentence and its rhythm and grace determines sentence fluency.  Aspects of fluency include the following:  logic, phrasing, parallel structure, alliteration, redundancy and sentence lengths

Conventions:

Punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage, capitalization and paragraphing fall under the umbrella of Conventions.

 

*    Purposeful and varied sentence beginnings

*    Variety of sentence structures and lengths

*    Control of spelling, punctuation and capitalization is relative to length and complexity of essay

*    Generally correct spelling—even among less common words

*    Accurate punctuation, both external and internal, guides readers through text:  periods, question marks, exclamation marks, commas, colons, and apostrophes

*    Correct comma usage within series, clauses and cities/states

*    Suitable grammar and usage that contribute to clarity

*    Surface errors do not detract from readability or fluency

*    Logical paragraphing facilitates readability

*    If used, natural sounding dialogue is typically correctly punctuated.

*    Varied beginnings of most sentences

*    Correct spelling of most high-frequency words

*    Writer demonstrates understanding of end punctuation and capitalization

*    Evidence of some correct internal punctuation: commas in a series and apostrophes in contractions

*    Few subject/verb agreement problems

*    Surface errors related to spelling, punctuation and capitalization do not detract from readability or meaning

*    Appropriate paragraphing

*    Correct punctuation of dialogue if attempted


Idaho 5th Grade Direct Writing Assessment Scoring Standard For Narrative Writing          January 2005

General Descriptions of Levels of Proficiency

“2”

Basic (Caution)

“1”

Below Basic (Alert)

Narrative writing tells about sequences of events, usually with the structure of a fiction or nonfiction story.

 

A “2” paper demonstrates some degree of basic narrative writing skills, but is clearly flawed.  It reveals one or more of the following weaknesses:

 

1.   Inadequate organization or development

2.   Inadequate narration of events

3.   Limited or inappropriate word choices

4.   A pattern or accumulation of errors in mechanics, usage, sentence structure or word choices

 

A score of "2" indicates that the student's writing for that day and prompt is developing toward proficiency at grade level.

 

A “1” paper demonstrates basic narrative writing deficiencies and exhibits one or more of the following:

 

1.      Serious and persistent writing errors

2.      Incoherency

3.      Underdevelopment

4.      One or more of following:

too brief to assess; written in a language other than English; not written in black ink; written to a topic other than specified in prompt; written in mode other than narrative

A score of "1" indicates that the student's writing for that day and prompt is minimal at grade level.

Focusing on Six Traits

“2” Papers Exhibit MOST of the Characteristics Listed Below

“1” Papers Exhibit MOST of the Characteristics Listed Below

Ideas/Organization

Ideas

Ideas are the story line of the essay that, together with elaboration, anecdotes or selected details, build reader’s understanding.

Organization

Organization, the internal structure of an essay, includes the lead, close and linking details.  Together, they create a picture that builds to a turning point in the story.  Transitions within the story assist the reader to avoid getting lost.

*    Little elaboration or description of narrative elements: characters, setting and plot

*    Weak introduction/conclusion

*    Some evidence of beginning, middle and end

*    Unfocused topic

*    Ideas are sometimes unclear, undeveloped and lack detail

*    Equal emphasis on all or many items

*    Skeletal listing of events

*    Logical progression of writing with some wandering

*    Irrelevant information

*    Limited or unclear information, inadequate length or blank

*    Lacking or simplistic introduction/conclusion

*    Lack of structure-limited organization

*    Topic difficult to determine

*    Little or no focus of details

*   Repetitious and or/disconnected writing

*    Random and purposeless sequencing

*   Sketchy and loosely-focused writing frequently requiring reader to infer information

Voice/Word Choices

Voice

Voice involves effective writing that holds the reader's attention through the use of appropriate vocabulary.  Descriptive and figurative language makes writing unique by creating mood and feeling for the reader.

Word Choices

Word Choice involves the selecting words to create the mood, impression or word picture a writer desires to instill within the reader.

 

*    Limited figurative language and/or sensory adjectives and verbs

*    Emerging and retreating voice

*    Limited vocabulary

*    Below grade-level vocabulary

*    Generic, empty adjectives: good, bad, nice, cool, fun

*    Few sensory adjectives and verbs

*    Redundant use of words and/or phrases

*    Inadequate language

*    Simplistic responses to thoughts and feelings

*    Seeming lack of awareness of audience

*    Little or no descriptive or specific language

*    Lack of voice

*    Limited vocabulary

*    Incorrectly used words

*    Vague or empty words and/or phrases

*    Redundancies

*    Lacks risk; tends to shut-out reader

*    Mechanical and /or lifeless

*    Frequently difficult to decipher and/or understand

Fluency/Conventions

Sentence Fluency

Effective construction of a sentence and its rhythm and grace determines sentence fluency.  Aspects of fluency include the following:  logic, phrasing, parallel structure, alliteration, redundancy and sentence lengths

Conventions

Punctuation, spelling, grammar, usage, capitalization and paragraphing fall under the umbrella of Conventions.

 

*    Attempts to vary sentence beginnings

*    Predominant use of simple sentences

*    Incomplete, choppy and/or run-on sentences

*    Frequent listing of events:  I did, then I did, then I did

*    Frequent misspellings

*    Frequent grammar and usage errors

*    Inconsistent subject/verb agreement

*    Surface errors related to spelling, punctuation and capitalization detract from readability or meaning

*    Common starts among sentences

*    Short, simple sentences frequently connected by “and” or “that”

*    Choppy, rambling and/or awkward sentences

*    Incorrect sentence structure-includes fragments and run-ons

*    Little or no grasp of spelling patterns

*    Phonetic spelling

*    Frequent lack of end and internal punctuation

*    Grammar and/or usage errors

*    Surface errors hinder or even hide readability